British furniture retailer reveals stand out trends over past 60 years

Is YOUR living room stuck in the ’70s? Experts reveal how trends have changed over the decades – from retro bold colours to today’s eco-friendly designs

  • Habitat has highlighted some of their standout trends from the past six decades
  • Furniture retailer revealed the way homeowners decorate their living spaces
  • Detailed flat pack furniture in the 60s to bold colours and shapes in the 70s

Over the decades, interior designs and trends have constantly evolved, influencing the way homeowners decorate their living spaces.

As interior design trends continue to shift and adapt, more people are looking for ways to improve their own home.

To celebrate almost 60 years on the British high street, Habitat has highlighted some of their standout trends from the past six decades to show how design has changed over the years. 

Each decade has brought a new flare to the interior design industry, from flat pack furniture in the 60s to bold colours and shapes in the 70s, each shaping the way Brits furnish their living room spaces today.

Here FEMAIL reveals a snapshot of British interior design trends throughout the past 60 years. 

1960s  

To celebrate nearly 60-years of trading, Habitat has highlighted some of their standout trends from the past six decades, including the 1960s (pictured) 

The bright colour palettes that defined design in this decade continued to influence British interiors for years to come

 Designers started to experiment with new materials such as plastics and woods when it came to furniture 

The 60s saw the birth of the flatpack living room and brought a European style to interior design. 

Designers started to experiment with new materials such as plastics and combined more vibrant colours with new shapes and styles. 

The bright colour palettes that defined the decade continued to influence British interiors for years to come.

Low level chairs became one of the latest trends, while golds orange and yellows were a popular colour scheme when it came to painting your walls.

The 60s saw designers use materials such as wood and plastic more frequently and the birth of flatpack furniture saw a more european style of design come to the UK 

1970s 

Prints and patterns were dominant throughout, with floral motifs and audacious colours being some of the defining features of the decade

Stepping away from the formal style of the 60s, this decade saw more retro and vintage inspired decor

During the 70s, designers experimented with bolder colours and exciting new shapes

During the 70s, designers experimented with bolder colours and exciting new shapes. 

Prints and patterns were dominant throughout, with floral motifs and audacious colours being some of the defining features of the decade.

Stepping away from the formal style of the 60s, this decade saw more retro and vintage inspired decor – while Scandinavian style became ever more popular – particularly when it came to rugs.  

Psychedelic prints were a defining feature of the decade and one stand out home accessory was of course, the bean bag.

1980s 

Designs in the 80s were unashamedly flamboyant in their patterns, while striking primary colours made it one of the most colourful decades

Inspired by preppy styles and lively colours, striking statement pieces continued from the 70s into the 80s

Desk and table lamps were at the height of popularity in the 80s and their influence has carried through to modern day design

Similarly, geometric grid patterns began trending in the UK in the 1980s, alongside minimalist and colourful prints

Inspired by preppy styles and lively colours, striking statement pieces continued from the 70s into the 80s. 

Designs in the 80s were unashamedly flamboyant in their patterns, while striking primary colours made it one of the most colourful decades.

Desk and table lamps were at the height of popularity in the 80s and their influence has carried through to modern day design.

Similarly, geometric grid patterns began trending in the UK in the 1980s, alongside minimalist and colourful prints.

1990s

Vibrant colour palettes began to settle and return to more muted styles. Wood and wicker were popular materials amongst the 90s home design trends

Orange-stained oak and blonde pine colours made their way indoors, bringing natural elements and colours inside

After years of adventurous colours and patterns, minimalist designs started to take prominence in the 90s. 

Vibrant colour palettes began to settle and return to more muted styles. Wood was a popular material amongst the 90s home design trends. 

Orange-stained oak and blonde pine colours made their way indoors, bringing natural elements and colours inside.

Wicker was a key trend in the 90s, while modern floor lamps became the style when it came to lighting 

2000s 

After the minimalism transition during the 90s, brighter and bolder statements were back on the rise, mixing modern products from multiple brands with antiques in the 2000s

With a new century came new designs. People began to feature futuristic and modern pieces in their homes

With chairs now selling as single items, many designers began to mix and match colours and furniture 

With a new century came new designs. People began to feature futuristic and modern pieces in their homes. 

Times were evolving, along with interior trends to match this new era. After the minimalism transition during the 90s, brighter and bolder statements were back on the rise, mixing modern products from multiple brands with antiques.

The 00s saw another shift in style when it came to how relaxed the room was – turning from a more classic living space into a fun outgoing room.

This allowed for a mix match of colours and styles, especially with chairs now selling as single items 

2010s 

Patterned rugs became the trend of the 2010s, with looks brought together by smaller home accessories such as pillows 

Two key focuses of the 10s were making the most out of limited space and decluttering any excess possessions

Vintage pieces were used to add depth and make spaces feel more curated in the 2010s

Modern styles were evolving, and the popularity of having white and nude coloured walls shone a spotlight on the furniture and accessories

Modern styles were evolving, and the popularity of having white and nude coloured walls shone a spotlight on the furniture and accessories. 

Two key focuses of the 10s were making the most out of limited space and decluttering any excess possessions, while adding storage furniture to avoid mess within the home.

Patterned rugs became the trend of the 2010s, with looks brought together by smaller home accessories such as pillows. 

2020s 

This decade sees the Marie Kondo effect take place, with an emphasis on adding storage furniture such as sofas to de-clutter the space 

Neutral colours and intricate patterns are being used in 2020s  to make the space feel more inviting 

In 2020 and beyond, people will likely embrace segmented rooms and create a space that feels engaging for one purpose and separate from the rest of the home

In 2020 and beyond, people will likely embrace segmented rooms and create a space that feels engaging for one purpose and separate from the rest of the home. 

More modular and small space opportunities are rising, with a biophilic and eco-friendly approach to interior design.

This decade sees the Marie Kondo effect take place, with an emphasis on adding storage furniture to de-clutter the space.

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