Nurse who hunts in spare time told by trolls they will 'kill her baby'

Nurse, 30, who spends her free time hunting hits back at double standards of trolls who threaten to murder and rape her children after seeing pictures of her kills on social media

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
  • Kate Small, 30, was messaged by trolls after she shared snaps of dead animals
  • They cruelly threatened to kill her ‘baby in a blender’ because she is a hunter
  • Kate, from Idaho, insisted that hunting promotes sustainability and conservation
  • The nurse hopes to pass on hunting on to her two daughters when they grow up 

A nurse who hunts in her spare time was cruelly targeted by trolls who said they would kill her ‘baby in a blender’ after she posted pictures of dead animals online.

Kate Small, 30, from Boise, Idaho, began hunting with her stepfather Tom when she was 19-years-old, something she now does with her husband Justin and hopes to share with her two daughters.

The registered nurse insisted hunting promotes sustainability by managing animal populations, but she has received massive backlash for her love of the hobby.

After posting photographs of her dead hunts online, Kate received ‘thousands’ of death threats from trolls who threatened to kill her daughter Finley, two. 

Kate Small, 30, from Boise, Idaho, was targeted by trolls who said they would kill her ‘baby in a blender’ after she posted pictures of dead animals online (pictured with a wolf she harvested)

Despite the grisly threats, Kate tries to laugh them off and said condemning someone for hunting animals and then threatening to kill their pets and children is a double standard.

Kate said she gets the most backlash on her photographs of dead bears, which she believes is because people see them as ‘cute or cuddly’.

She explained: I’d never wish these comments on my worst enemy. I’ve received thousands of death threats and hundreds of people have told me they will rape and murder my two-year-old daughter.

‘I recall one person saying, ‘I’m going to put your baby in a blender and listen to her scream.’

‘I’ve also had people say they are doing to murder my dogs which doesn’t make any sense. If you’re mad that I’ve killed an animal, why would you then kill an animal?

‘Sometimes I respond. I try and educate and explain but sometimes my sarcasm gets the better of me and I’ll approach it with humor.’

The nurse began hunting with her stepfather Tom when she was 19 years old, something she now does with her husband Justin and hopes to pass on to her two daughters

After posting photographs of her dead hunts online, Kate received ‘thousands’ of death threats from cruel trolls who threatened to kill her daughter Finley, two, and her dogs

Kate said she gets the most backlash on the pictures of dead bears (above) she shares online, which she believes is because people see them as ‘cute or cuddly’

Kate said hunters are able to manage animal populations by hunting certain species and without this, herds could suffer from an overabundance of predators or lack of vegetation.

She said that she salvages enough meat in the hunting season to feed her family for most of the year, while she uses the animal hide and head for mounting. 

Kate claimed that because each animal is hunted for meat or conservation, very little goes to waste. The only animals Kate does not eat are wolves or vermin species like badgers and coyotes due to the parasites they carry.

She explained: ‘Hunting truly is conservation. We do it to help manage wildlife in the United States.

‘I salvage as much meat as I possibly can. I never take animals for fun. It’s always for food or conservation.’

The biggest animal Kate has hunted was a Shiras moose, which weighed around 1,000lbs and was six-feet tall, while her hardest kill was a wolf because they are ‘extremely intelligent with extraordinary vision’.

She has received an outpouring of support from within the hunting community, but the photographs of dead animals she has posted online prompted floods of hateful messages.

She added: ‘I’ve been fortunate enough to have received a lot of support from the hunting community. There’s nothing but love and positivity from those who understand.

‘For those who don’t, I get questions from people who are curious and want to know more and then of course, there’s the plain old-fashioned hate.

‘It’s usually geared toward my wolf or bear hunting pictures because people tend to see these predators as cute or cuddly.’

Kate began hunting with her stepfather Tom when she was 19-years-old, who she also spent months with setting up trail cameras and tracking animal behaviours.

She explained: ‘My stepdad had grown up hunting and it was something he wanted to pass along to me.

‘I started joining him when I was nineteen and it was a way for us to bond and connect. It quickly became a passion of mine and it’s still something we do together.

Kate said the biggest animal she has hunted was a Shiras moose (pictured), which weighed around one-thousand-pounds and was six-feet tall


The hunter insisted she has an ‘immense respect’ for animals and ‘deeply cares’ about them, while she is keen to educate others on the benefits and legality of hunting

Kate, who hunts with her husband Justin, hopes to teach her daughters (all pictured) as she is keen on providing for her family and values the organic meat she is able to harvest

‘It takes months of effort and strategizing including finding the right areas, setting up trail camera, tracking animal habits, and preparing for days to weeks spent in the backcountry.

‘On a typical day, I’d get up before sunrise and find a good area to glass from at first light. Once I’ve spotted an animal, I will stalk in on it – factoring in wind and thermals so it doesn’t catch your scent.

‘You can end up hiking for over ten miles in one day. If you are lucky enough to harvest an animal then the real work begins – quartering the animal, and preserving and packing the meat and hide.

‘It’s trying work yet very rewarding. If I’m not working, I’m usually hunting.’

Kate, who now hunts with her husband Justin, hopes to teach her children hunting because she said she is keen on providing for her family and values the organic, nutritious meat that she is able to harvest.

She continued: ‘I like being able to know exactly where my food came from and that I worked hard to get it. I can provide organic, nutritious meals for my family.

‘At the same time, I can create everlasting memories with friends and family. Even if I don’t harvest an animal, memories made on a mountain whilst battling the elements and being pushed to your limits are invaluable.

‘Hunting is a way of life; being able to connect with Mother Nature, watching and learning the habits of God’s creatures, the views as the sun rises and hits a mountain peak.

‘It’s a mind game that tests not just your physical endurance, but mental resilience too.’

Despite the negative backlash from her hunting, Kate said she is keen to educate others on the benefits of hunting, including its 100 per cent legality and the fact that hunters raise more money for domestic wildlife conservation than any other group in the United States.

She insisted that she has an ‘immense respect’ for animals and ‘deeply cares’ about them, while she said she is always happy to answer questions from people on social media.

Kate explained: ‘If people have questions, I’m more than happy for people to contact me on Instagram. It’s important to me to educate those who don’t understand.

‘All of the hunting I do is one-hundred per cent legal and I would like people to know that hunters raise more money for conservation than any other group combined.

Kate said salvages enough meat in the hunting season to feed her family for most of the year, while she uses the animal hide and head for mounting

The nurse (pictured with dead bear) insisted that ‘Mother Nature’ is more cruel than hunting, saying she believes a ‘single shot’ is a ‘much better way to go’ rather than dying slowly

Kate (pictured with kill) said hunters are able to manage animal populations by hunting certain species in the United States and without this, herds could suffer from overpopulation

‘I have an immense respect for animals and deeply care about them. Every year, fish and game quotas are released specifying how many of each species in each particular area can and should be hunted.

‘These quotas are based on scientific research which aims to keep populations at their healthiest. Hunting helps these animals combat spread of disease and competition for food.’

The nurse also claimed that ‘Mother Nature’ is more cruel than hunting, saying she believes a ‘single shot’ is a ‘much better way to go’ rather than dying slowly and painfully.

She added: ‘I know people think hunting is cruel but it isn’t. You know what is cruel? Mother Nature.

‘Have you ever seen an elk get half eaten by wolves and suffer for hours while it slowly and painfully dies? Have you ever seen a mule deer gradually waste away and eventually die of starvation?

‘I don’t know about you but a single shot to the vitals sounds like a much better way to go.

‘I’ve had many great conversations with people that are against hunting. If they are willing to listen to the facts and science behind it, they usually indicate they understand the reason and importance for hunting.

‘Sadly, a lot of people I talk with let emotions control their viewpoints so all reasoning is lost on them.’ 

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