Man City star Riyad Mahrez had three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raid on his penthouse – The Sun

MAN City’s Riyad Mahrez had three luxury watches stolen in a £500,000 raid.

Thieves took cash, rare football shirts and bracelets from his penthouse.

Burglars carefully tracked Riyad Mahrez before sneaking into his penthouse and stealing three watches to order.

The £500,000 haul included a prized Richard Mille timepiece similar to one that knife thugs snatched from England’s Dele Alli two weeks ago.

Raiders cased Mahrez’s ­luxury block and got hold of a key fob to gain access.

As well as the £230,000 Mille, the Man City star lost a £40,000 Rolex Daytona and a £35,000 Rolex Day Date.



The gang took more than £50,000 in cash, Cartier bracelets and rare football shirts worth up to £150,000.

A source said: “Riyad is among an elite group who own a Mille.

“They are the ultimate dressing room status symbol.

“He fears he was being watched beforehand.

“There’s no doubt it was stolen to order.”

Milles cost up to £1.6million and are a favourite with the rich and top sports stars.


They are famed for their precious stones and made from the same material as space shuttles and F1 cars.

Different designs are owned by Ed Sheeran, Kanye West and footballer Neymar.

£200,000-a-week midfielder Mahrez, 29, was out when the gang sneaked into his Manchester city centre apartment.

He moved there after splitting from wife Rita.

A letter sent to residents said: “Four apartments were accessed without authority using a fob which had general access throughout the building.

“The fob in question is now in our possession, has been fully deactivated and cannot be used again.”

RAIDS' SCORE

Mahrez has posted social media pictures of himself wearing the watches.

Earlier this month Spurs ace Dele, 24, was robbed of three watches after two raiders burst into his £2million North London home as he played pool with girlfriend Ruby Mae.

Teammate Jan Vertonghen’s home was robbed in March while he was playing for Spurs in Germany.

In January Crystal Palace’s Mamadou Sakho lost more than £500,000 of items in a burglary.

A Greater Manchester Police spokeswoman said of the raid on Riyad Mahrez: “At around 5pm on Friday April 24, police were called to reports that four separate apartments had been burgled at a city centre block.”

Algerian international Mahrez won the Premier League with Leicester City in 2015/16 when he was players’ player of the year.

He signed for City two years later and has since won the Premier League again, the FA Cup and the League Cup twice.

He married Kent-born Rita in 2015 and the couple have two daughters.

Before their split, Rita told how her husband enjoyed the quiet life.

In February The Sun revealed he had been on a string of dates with fashion student Taylor Ward, 22 — the daughter of reality star Dawn, 46, and ex-Sheffield United striker Ashley, 49.

Players targeted for bling

RIYAD Mahrez is the latest footie star to fall prey to criminals targeting them for watches, jewellery and cash.

This year alone raiders have struck at the homes of Spurs’ Dele Alli and Jan Vertonghen plus Crystal Palace’s Mamadou Sakho.

Alli was held at knifepoint. Vertonghen, who was away on Champions League duty, was left distraught after his wife and children were held up in the family home.

In February last year a gang took watches, phones and car keys from Sadio Mané’s home as he played for Liverpool.

A month earlier, Marcus Rashford’s brother Dane and Tyler Alexander-Arnold, brother of Liverpool’s Trent, were robbed of their £25,000 watches when six armed raiders burst into a Manchester restaurant. Their cars were also stolen.

In 2017 Andy Carroll was followed by two men on a motorbike as he drove from West Ham’s training ground.

They pulled up alongside and demanded his £22,000 Rolex before giving chase.
Wayne Rooney’s £4million Cheshire home was hit by burglars as he played in his 2016 testimonial. Romelu Lukaku, then playing for Everton, was ­targeted in the same year.

  • By Richard Moriarty
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We had to watch our beloved cat be put down in the vet car park

After a week of homeschooling and general lockdown lethargy, the Gardeners’ World tribute to Monty Don’s dear departed dog, Nigel, finally tipped me over the edge.

Blubbing into my wine, I realised I wasn’t alone – #RIPNigel began trending on Twitter; the poignant, minute-long montage resonating with everyone who’s ever loved and lost a cherished pet. 

I wept for Nigel (such a good boy) and for Monty, whose sorrow I recognised.

But I mainly wept for Frank, our beloved 13-year-old cat who, on May 1, had to be put to sleep in the vet’s car park due to Covid-19.

We weren’t prepared to say goodbye to our big, beautiful tabby at all, let alone like that. He was an ever-present part of our family, and my husband, Simon and I adored him. Our children, Izzy, 12, and Ollie, seven, loved him unconditionally too, having been on the receiving end of Frank’s unwavering affection their entire lives.

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During the first week of lockdown, Frank was a permanent fixture in Ollie’s bedroom; his cuddles and purr calming us both as we adjusted to the strange ‘new normal’.

We noticed Frank wasn’t eating much, and had suddenly started to drool, leaving wet, blood-stained circles on the duvet.

As the vet’s was now shut for routine appointments, I sent them an email describing Frank’s symptoms and attached some photos of his mouth.

Later that day, I was asked to bring him to the practice. I waited in the car while Sophie the vet examined him. Unable to pinpoint the cause of Frank’s drooling, we agreed to give him a shot of antibiotics which would hopefully get rid of any underlying infection.

I assumed Frank would bounce back as he had on so many occasions. I was wrong.

In the weeks that followed Frank was prescribed stronger antibiotics and steroids, but his symptoms got progressively worse. Skinny, matted and a shadow of the cat he once was, it was clear something was seriously wrong.

Biopsies taken from Frank’s mouth confirmed the news Sophie had gently prepared us for: an aggressive, inoperable, tumour was growing under his tongue.

Knowing we couldn’t let him suffer anymore, we arranged to have him put down the following day. But first, we had to tell the children.

It was their first experience of death, so I read up on the best terminology to use before explaining that Frank wasn’t going to get better, and because we loved him so much, we had to end his suffering.

The vet would give him an injection to make him die quickly and peacefully, I told them. He wouldn’t feel a thing – we were helping him by taking his pain away.

Izzy instantly understood and sobbed into Frank’s frail body. Ollie looked confused then horrified.

‘We can’t make him die!’ he cried. ‘Frankie won’t know… he won’t know what the vet’s going to do to him’.

None of the online articles had prepared me for that. It was brutal.

On May Day morning, after hours of gut-wrenching tears and goodbyes, Simon and I drove to the vets in silence, too emotionally drained to talk.

Familiar now with the social distancing drill, we handed Frank over to Sophie, who took him inside to put an intravenous catheter in his leg.

Ten minutes later, she returned with the carrier, setting it on the ground. Simon lifted it into the front of the car with us, closed the door and let Frank out. I caught him as he scrabbled about, wild-eyed and terrified, and held him tight to my chest.

Sophie opened the door and quickly attached the long, spiral IV line to the catheter in his leg.

She threaded the line back towards her through the gap in the passenger window and shut the door.

Attaching the IV line to the liquid-filled syringe, she asked if we wanted to say a final goodbye. We shook our heads; we’d been saying goodbye for days.

Frank’s death was indeed quick and painless. Seconds after Sophie pushed the plunger into the barrel of the syringe, his scared, rigid body relaxed. His head lolled onto the blanket covering my lap and his body followed.

We cried as we stroked our beautiful boy long after his heart stopped beating, relieved he was finally at peace.

We buried Frank in the garden that afternoon under his favourite bird-watching tree, with some treats and his favourite catnip lizard.

We’re slowly getting used to life without him. The house feels strange and quiet and we all feel the weight of his absence, perhaps more than normal because we’re stuck at home. 

It’s certainly been a tough life lesson for the kids, but they’re coping with it well. Ollie puts fresh flowers on Frank’s grave most days, while Izzy sits beside it and reads; simple acts they probably wouldn’t have time for if we weren’t in lockdown.

Like Monty Don’s Nigel, Frank had a good life and we’re so thankful he spent it with us.

We’re lucky to have had him in our lives and to have been with him to the end. Coronavirus didn’t rob us of that like it has done for the millions of people who’ve lost loved ones.

That’s the positive we’re holding on to.

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England had MORE deaths than Italy during peak of Covid-19 outbreak

England suffered MORE coronavirus deaths than Italy during the peak of the outbreak, academics say amid claims ministers are covering up the impact of COVID-19 in the UK by ditching global comparison charts

  • London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine researchers looked at total excess mortality in countries
  • Italy’s outbreak peak occurred back on March 27 with 15,000 fatalities that week – 103% higher than average
  • Data also revealed England’s coronavirus deaths peaked two weeks later, according to the LSHTM academics
  • There were almost 20,000 deaths in the week ending April 10, a 109% jump on the same week in years before 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

England suffered more coronavirus deaths than Italy during the peak of the COVID-19 crisis, according to a shock new analysis. 

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine researchers looked at total excess mortality, which shows how many more people than average have died in a period.

Figures showed Italy’s outbreak peak occurred on March 27, with almost 15,000 fatalities that week – 103 per cent higher than the average for the same week in previous years.

Data also revealed England hit the peak two weeks later, which chimed with claims throughout the early outbreak that Britain was a fortnight behind Italy. It showed there were almost 20,000 deaths in the week ending April 10, a 109 per cent jump on the same week in years before. 

It comes as officials have been accused of a cover-up by ditching the global death comparison charts in the daily Downing Street briefings. Critics noticed the slide was withheld from the press conferences after it clearly showed the UK had become Europe’s hardest-hit nation.    

The Government has said now is not the time for international comparisons, and tried to paint them as unreliable as the death toll continues to rise in Britain. 

Figures showed Italy’s peak occurred on March 27, with almost 15,000 fatalities that week. Analysis showed the total number of deaths was 103 per cent higher than the average for the same week in previous years. Data also revealed England hit the peak two weeks later, which chimed with claims throughout the early outbreak that Britain was a fortnight behind Italy. It showed there were almost 20,000 deaths in the week ending April 10, a 109 per cent jump on the same week in years before

Graphs show how the number of excess deaths compared across the US, with New York City having the biggest spike in extra fatalities

Official figures show 34,636 Brits who have tested positive for COVID-19 have now died since the first death was confirmed at the start of March.

But the true death toll is likely to be much higher because it only takes into account laboratory-confirmed cases, missing thousands of suspected patients.

And the official toll – given by the Department of Health every day – is also affected by a recording lag. Hospitals can take weeks to announce a death. 

Using this way of looking at deaths, the UK has the world’s second-highest death toll – behind only the US (90,000).

The UK’s Office for National Statistics is collecting more accurate data and suggests that, so far, the true death toll is considerably higher, probably in excess of 45,000.  

The ONS figure is much higher because it has always included people who die anywhere in the community, as well as those who were never officially tested but had COVID-19 mentioned on their death certificate.

Department of Health data does not include anyone who has not tested positive. 

Many scientists say the most accurate way of looking at the true scale of the COVID-19 crisis is to take an in-depth look at ‘excess deaths’. 

Excess deaths are those which occur in addition to any that would be expected to happen in the same period in an average year. 

They are measured in the UK over a five-year average.

For example, if the average number of deaths in the first week of April over the least five years was 10,000, the 10,001st person to die in that week is considered an excess death, along with any others who come after them.

Ministers have admitted ‘excess deaths’  are the most reliable measure of how many fatalities the coronavirus has actually contributed to. 

They take into account not just infected people who have died of COVID-19 but also those who died because of indirect effects of the outbreak. 

The biggest contribution to this is expected to be people whose medical treatment was interrupted or stopped because of the pandemic, including people who avoided going to hospital. NHS data shows A&E attendances have halved since March. 

Excess deaths are those which occur in addition to any that would be expected to happen in the same period in an average year. 

They are measured in the UK over a five-year average.

For example, if the average number of deaths in the first week of April over the least five years was 10,000, the 10,001st person to die in that week is considered an excess death, along with any others who come after them.

Ministers have admitted ‘excess deaths’  are the most reliable measure of how many fatalities the coronavirus has actually contributed to. 

They take into account not just infected people who have died of COVID-19 but also those who died because of indirect effects of the outbreak. 

The biggest contribution to this is expected to be people whose medical treatment was interrupted or stopped because of the pandemic, including people who avoided going to hospital. NHS data shows A&E attendances have halved since March. 

ONS figures released last week – the most recent available – showed at least 50,000 more people than usual have died in Britain since the pandemic began.    

Sir David Spiegelhalter, a statistician at the University of Cambridge, said analysing all-cause mortality was the best way to look at scale of the crisis.

He told independent organisation FullFact: ‘I feel the only unbiased comparison you could make between different countries is by looking at all-cause mortality.

‘There are so many questions about the rise we have seen in deaths that have not got COVID-19 on the death certificate.’

He added that many of these will be ‘inevitably linked in some way to this epidemic’, saying that those figures he would ‘prefer to look at’. 

Professor Michael Coleman, an epidemiologist at LSHTM, told The Guardian: ‘Even if all the persons whose death certificate mentioned Covid-19 are counted, a quarter of the excess mortality in England and Wales is not explained.

‘This occurs because some deaths caused by coronavirus occur among people who were not tested.  

‘Other deaths occur among people with pre-existing cardiac or respiratory conditions that were made worse by coronavirus, and some deaths from unrelated conditions may occur because the health system was overwhelmed.

‘All these deaths form part of the overall public health impact of the epidemic, but they will not be revealed by restricting reports to deaths among people who were tested for Covid-19.

‘So, in a fast-moving pandemic, the cause of death on the death certificate is not a good way to assess the overall public health impact of the disease.’

Scientists say that accurately comparing countries is difficult and unreliable because each government records death and disease differently, making like-for-like comparisons impossible.

But looking at even raw numbers shows the UK is doing worse than its neighbours, experts say, and can give a broad view of what is happening globally.

Another EU monitoring project has shown England has had the worst excess death rate in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic. 

EuroMOMO assigns each country a ‘Z-score’, showing the deviation from a five-year average of excess deaths.

Many countries, including Spain, Germany, France and Italy, have recorded a spike in excess deaths during the pandemic.

But figures collected by EuroMOMO show England performing worse than Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland or any other European country.

England’s Z-score peaked at 44.1 during the week that ended April 19, according to the monitoring project, with Spain in second place at 34.7.

The other three UK nations had a far lower Z-score, with Wales peaking at 19.3, Scotland at 17.3 and Northern Ireland at 8.5.

This chart shows the excess death rate of ten European nations as calculated by EU-backed monitoring project EuroMOMO, with England in a clear lead. The figures are for Week 16, which ended April 19

An EU monitoring project assigns each country a ‘Z-score’, showing the deviation from a five-year average of excess deaths. Many countries, including Belgium, have recorded a spike in excess deaths during the pandemic

France has also recorded a spike in excess deaths amid the coronavirus pandemic. The charts, collected by EuroMOMO, show the average Z score dating all the way back until 2015

Italy recorded a spike in excess deaths during the pandemic but Greece and Hungary have yet to experience a spate of deaths, according to EuroMOMO figures

The Netherlands has also experienced a spike in excess deaths, the charts show. In comparison, Norway, Malta and Luxembourg have avoided a wave of extra fatalities

Spain, Sweden and Switzerland have all suffered a spike in excess deaths, whereas Portugal has yet to experience a rise

England’s Z-score peaked at 44.1 during the week that ended April 19, according to the monitoring project, with Spain in second place at 34.7. The other three UK nations had a far lower Z-score, with Wales peaking at 19.3, Scotland at 17.3 and Northern Ireland at 8.5

The UK announced a further 170 deaths from coronavirus today on the first Sunday since draconian lockdown measures were eased

The global death comparison graph has been a fixture of Number 10 coronavirus press conferences but the data is no longer being published by the Government. This chart was taken from a Downing Street briefing last week

It comes after Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer last week accused Boris Johnson of a cover-up after officials scrapped the international death toll comparison graph. 

The graph – comparing the UK to Italy, the US and other nations – was a fixture of the daily Number 10 press conference throughout the outbreak. 

Sir Keir claimed at Prime Minister’s Questions the data is being withheld because it shows the UK is the worst affected nation in Europe.

The Prime Minister hit back and said it was ‘premature’ to make such comparisons as he labelled coronavirus a ‘once in a century epidemic’.  

But Mr Johnson’s defence was called ‘baffling’ by Sir Keir, as he pointed out that the Government has repeatedly published the graph during the crisis.

Jenny Harries, the Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, then piled the pressure on Number 10 to change tack.

She told the daily Downing Street press conference last week there was ‘no reason’ why the data could not be published. 

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Prince Andrew ‘had foot massage while watching King’s Speech’ after Epstein ‘arranged for women to meet him at mansion’ – The Sun

PRINCE Andrew received a foot massage while watching Hollywood film The King's Speech after Jeffrey Epstein arranged for three women to meet him, an ex-model who was part of the paedophile's inner circle has claimed.

The women, all in their early twenties, were allegedly told to "dress up beautifully" for the meetings at Epstein's New York mansion and promised a "bright career future, powerful connections and money" in return.



Evidence seen by the Mail on Sunday reportedly suggests that at least two of the meetings – and possibly all three – occurred during a visit the Duke of York made to Epstein's home in December 2010.

The newspaper reports Andrew allegedly had his feet massaged by a woman while watching Colin Firth star in the movie as his grandfather King George VI.

The source claimed: "Whenever Epstein watched a movie, he requested girls to give him and his guests a foot massage.

"I am pretty certain Andrew was given the same treatment. It is unlikely they watched the movie alone and without a massage."

Literary agent John Brockman has previously claimed he witnessed the Duke of York receiving a foot massage from two Russian women at Epstein's mansion.

Epstein, who killed himself in August while awaiting trial on charges of sex trafficking minors, had only months before the 2010 visit completed a 13-month stint in jail following a conviction for procuring an underage girl for prostitution.

Andrew has always maintained he made the trip only to cut ties with Epstein.

The prince has previously been accused of having sex with Epstein victim Virginia Roberts when she was 17, though has always denied wrongdoing.

Discussing the 2010 visit in a widely-criticised BBC interview in November, Andrew said: "Now, I went there with the sole purpose of saying to him that because he had been convicted, it was inappropriate for us to be seen together."

But the account given by the anonymous insider contradicts that claim.

"I think that it was Epstein who invited Andrew to NYC," the source said.

"The girls were going to Epstein’s house specifically to meet Andrew, not just Epstein."

The source identifies one of the three women as model Lana Zakocela, who had worked for Victoria Secret, which is owned by Epstein's financial client, Les Wexner.

The source also told the Mail on Sunday that Epstein used the prince to improve his image following his release from jail.

"I think Andrew was incredibly useful for him as a promotion tool," she said.

"He had just left jail, and to show a guest of such a level was perfect for his social capital.

"He was telling everyone that the prince was in the city."

Epstein also reportedly spoke about watching 2010 Oscar winner The King's Speech, whose central character is George VI, Andrew's grandfather, with Andrew prior its release in the UK.

The insider says that Andrew might have received a foot massage from a woman during the screening.

Representatives of Prince Andrew have been approached for comment.


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Man shot by NYPD said he had coronavirus, tried to attempt suicide by cop

The man shot by NYPD cops in the Bronx after threatening the officers with a knife early Wednesday morning told police he has coronavirus and was attempting to commit suicide by cop, authorities and sources said.

Ricardo Cardona, who was shot near the corner of Zerega and Westchester avenues in Westchester Square at about 4 a.m., said he tested positive for the virus yesterday, sources said.

Cardona feared he was going to die because he was overweight and diabetic, according to sources.

He allegedly called 911 to report a person with a weapon and had poured ketchup on his knife to make it appear bloody before cops arrived.

Two officers shot him four times in the legs, police sources said.

He was taken to NYC Health and Hospitals/Jacobi in stable condition. Neither of the cops was injured.

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Study claims Mars once had reservoirs of water deep underground

Scientists have discovered that two unique reservoirs of ancient water once flowed deep beneath the surface of Mars.

It’s hard to believe, but at one time the dry and dusty Red Planet was wet and lush.

“A lot of people have been trying to figure out Mars’ water history,” University of Arizona planetary scientist Jessica Barnes said in a statement. “Like, where did water come from? How long was it in the crust [surface] of Mars? Where did Mars’ interior water come from? What can water tell us about how Mars formed and evolved?”

Barnes and her colleagues examined the isotopes of hydrogen locked inside Mars rocks. Isotopes are variants of an element with different numbers of neutrons. They studied samples they knew were originated from the planet’s crust: the Black Beauty and Allan Hills meteorites.

Two geochemically different types of Martian volcanic rocks — enriched shergottites and depleted shergottites — contain water with different hydrogen isotope ratios, the researchers found.

Their analysis, which was published today in Nature Geoscience, showed that Mars likely received water from at least two vastly different sources early in its history.

The variability the researchers found seems to imply that Mars, unlike Earth and the moon, never had an ocean of magma completely encompassing the planet.

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