Celebrity SAS star admits show DOES bully recruits after fans complain to Ofcom about Ant Middleton – The Sun

CELEBRITY SAS star Ollie Ollerton has admitted the Channel 4 show does bully recruits – just days after co-star Ant Middleton was hit by Ofcom complaints.

The former member of Britain's Special Forces revealed that while the show may push contestants to their limits, there's also an element bullying.

Speaking exclusively to The Sun Online, Ollie, 48, said: "To be honest the show from every angle is pushing it from a physical point of view and a mental point of view.

"We are experts at knowing when it's going too far, it's being able to know we are at the highest level, and that is why is the show is so successful.

"I know some of it is close to the bone, almost bullying in some respects but it's not that we've got to see how people handle any kind of, resilience, really you know if you want to be a special forces soldier you can't let that stuff affect you."

It comes days after it was revealed co-star Ant could face being investigated by Ofcom after he mocked Anthea Turner by calling the 59-year-old star "Grandma."



But Olly says Ant's hard-hitting approach isn't something he would enforce himself.

He added: "I do believe there should be a level of harshness because you've got to indoctrinate regardless of whether Ant goes hard.

"I wouldn't deal with them the way Ant does and he wouldn't go the way I do, but they've got to be able to push that to one side without there is all that noise going on.

"They've got to be able to get past the confusion humiliation and self doubt.

"No one is in a war zone saying, 'Oh that was a really good terrorist attack' or sat stop when something bad happens."

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The Special Forces officer admitted the show is 'close to the bone'Credit: Channel 4
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Ant's approach has been criticisedCredit: PA:Press Association

Ant's recent comment left many viewers fuming with the former soldier – who is only 20 years younger than Anthea – accusing him of "ageism and sexism".

The slur sparked 16 complaints to the TV watchdog.

Television presenter Anna Richardson was among those outraged by the cruel comments on the show, tweeting: "Good to see a bit of good ‘ol fashioned ageism & sexism there lads with the ‘grandma’ references."

However, Anthea herself said she wasn't bothered about the insults, calling it "water off a duck's back".

Ollie, who also works as a motivational speaker, began his military career at the age of 18 when he joined the Royal Marine Commandos and toured operationally in Northern Ireland & Operation Desert Storm in Iraq.

He has just released his second book, Battle Ready, and said it can be used as a guide to surviving lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic.

He told us: "The book really for me it's a war cry to procrastination to achieve the things you want to achieve in life, I was pretty broken.

"In 2015 I locked myself away in a house for two months and put into practice mind body and nutrition practises that I do to this day, it's a real call to action."

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Cat steals the show at classical concert by wandering among orchestra

Meow-sical interlude! Cat steals the show at classical concert as it wanders among the orchestra before joining the conductor on his podium

  • Orchestra was preparing for concert at Cemal Reşit Rey Hall in Istanbul, Turkey
  • A cat appeared on stage and started wandering about the cellists and violinists
  • After greeting the conductor, the cat took a prized spot up front to listen to the performance

This is the hilarious moment that an orchestral concert was reduced to fits of laughter – by an attention-seeking cat.

Audience members were thrilled by the curious feline who stole the conductor’s limelight, and then settled down in the best seat in the house to listen to the performance.

In the footage, which is being widely shared online, musicians are busy tuning their instruments to play a concert at the Cemal Reşit Rey Concert Hall in Istanbul, Turkey.

But they are soon joined by a Turkish Van-breed cat, who had been sitting below the conductor’s podium and was curious to see who was joining them.

Wandering through the strings section, a cellist can’t help but give the four-legged intruder a stroke, which is met by a roar of laughter from the audience.

Not receiving as much attention as desired, the cat quickly sneaks around to the violinists, wrapping itself around chair legs before walking out and surprising the musicians.

Musicians preparing for a concert at the Cemal Reşit Rey Concert Hall in Istanbul, Turkey were greeted by an attention-seeking feline intruder onstage

But the intruder doesn’t prove too popular with the players, and one of them even attempts to shoo the animal from the stage.

The cat is however determined to stay, and also wants to have the best seat in the house.

‘Anyone here allergic to cats?’ the conductor asks the audience, just as the feline jumps up onto the podium and surprises him. 

‘Anyone here allergic to cats?’ the conductor asks the audience, just as the feline jumps up onto the podium and surprises

Spectators cheer the cat’s determination, as the conductor allows the cat to stay, saying: ‘Well, we will play like this then.’ 

The orchestra then pick up their instrument and begin the performance, as the cat sits proudly at the front of the stage. 

The hilarious interruption was spotted during a live broadcast of the concert back in February, and has since been shared thousands of times.

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Photos show bizarre coronavirus lockdown fails from eating snacks with disposable gloves to snorkels at the supermarket – The Sun

THE CORONAVIRUS pandemic has left many people confused and unsure of how to navigate daily life under social distancing rules.

People from across the globe have snapped photos of strangers struggling with the new restrictions – and others just downright ignoring the guidelines. The photos were collected and shared by Bored Panda – here are some of the most bizarre…

DIDN'T SEE THE SIGN

CROOKED LINES

HANDS FULL

 

HEAD REST

 

SUPERMARKET DEEP DIVE

 

 

CASHING IN

 

MASK PARTY

 

SOCIAL, BUT NOT SO DISTANT

 

ISOLATION SNACK

 

SHOPPING SNACK

 

VISOR BREAK

 

FANCY DRESS

 

NOSE KNOWS

 

GETTING MOUTHY

 

KEEPING SANITARY

 

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Grim photos show workers still digging mass graves on Hart Island

Grim photos show workers still digging mass graves on Hart Island while bodies are stacked on the back of refrigerated trucks in NYC

  • Workers have been pictured standing over a mass grave on New York’s Hart Island, as another 778 people died from coronavirus Monday taking the total death toll to 10,834
  • A tree and burial plot markers also show where bodies already lie on the island off the coast of the Bronx 
  • Officials admitted last week the state had no choice left but to temporarily bury the mounting bodies of coronavirus victims in the mass burial site off the coast of the Bronx
  • Over on Randall’s Island, 69 refrigerated lorries were sitting in a parking lot outside of Icahn Stadium Tuesday 
  • Bodies were seen stacked in refrigerated lorries outside Brookdale Hospital Medical Center, Brooklyn 
  • Hospital morgues have been overflowing, leading to harrowing scenes where body bags litter hospital corridors and refrigerated trucks parked outside are acting as makeshift facilities
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Workers have been pictured standing over a mass grave on New York’s Hart Island, as another 778 people died from coronavirus Monday taking the total death toll to 10,834.

A handful of workers were seen at the historic site on Tuesday, after desperate officials admitted last week the state had no choice left but to bury the mounting bodies of coronavirus victims in the mass burial site.

Though the slowing rate of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and intubations spells welcome news for New Yorkers and suggests the state has hit its peak of the pandemic, the dead bodies keep pouring in.

Hospital morgues have been overflowing, leading to harrowing scenes where body bags litter hospital corridors and refrigerated trucks parked outside are acting as makeshift facilities.  

Workers have been pictured standing over a mass grave on New York’s Hart Island, as another 778 people died from coronavirus Monday taking the total death toll to 10,834

A handful of workers were seen at the historic site on Tuesday, after desperate officials admitted last week the state had no choice left but to bury the mounting bodies of coronavirus victims in the mass burial site

The knock-on effect on the state’s funeral homes, cemeteries and crematoriums has been equally dismal, as the facilities cannot keep up with the demand, leaving the bodies of the fallen with nowhere to go.

The bleak mass grave on Hart Island has become a temporary resting place for unclaimed, or unidentified, victims of coronavirus.

Workers, in regular clothing, were seen standing over a vast trench at what is the country’s largest public burial ground. 

A tree and previous burial plot markers were also seen, displaying where bodies already lie on the island off the coast of the Bronx.

The bleak mass grave on Hart Island has become a temporary resting place for unclaimed, or unidentified, victims of coronavirus

A tree and previous burial plot markers show where bodies lie on Hart Island located off the coast of the Bronx

The city has used Hart Island to bury New Yorkers with no known next of kin or whose family are unable to arrange a funeral since the 19th century. 

Typically, about 25 bodies are buried there once a week by low-paid Rikers Island jail inmates. 

That number began increasing last month as the new coronavirus spread rapidly and New York became the epicenter of the pandemic, with DailyMail.com reporting last week that about two dozen bodies are being buried there a day, five days a week. 

Prisoners from Rikers Island are usually brought in to dig graves on Hart Island but the Department of Corrections has since hired contracted laborers to carry out the work due to the outbreak.  

Over on Randall’s Island, New York, a staggering 69 refrigerated lorries were seen sitting in a parking lot outside of Icahn Stadium Tuesday

Prior to the pandemic, the stadium was used as a 5,000-seat athletics facility to host major sports events

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio responded to concerns about mass burials of coronavirus victims on social media on Friday.  

‘There will be no mass burials on Hart Island,’ de Blasio tweeted. ‘Everything will be individual and every body will be treated with dignity.’ 

For burial on the island, the dead are wrapped in body bags and placed inside pine caskets. The deceased’s name is scrawled in large letters on each casket, which helps if any body needs to be exhumed later. 

The caskets are buried in long narrow trenches excavated by digging machines. 

The island was once used as a Civil War prison camp, a tuberculosis patient colony, and a burial site for unclaimed victims of the HIV/AIDS epidemics in the 1980s. 

Today, instead of athletes and spectators sits a herd of trucks, poised and ready to be deployed as makeshift morgues to the state’s hospitals

Though the slowing rate of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and intubations spells welcome news for New Yorkers and suggests the state has hit its peak of the pandemic, the dead bodies keep pouring in

Over on Randall’s Island, New York, a staggering 69 refrigerated lorries were seen sitting in a parking lot outside of Icahn Stadium Tuesday.

Prior to the pandemic, the stadium was used as a 5,000-seat athletics facility to host major sports events.

Today, instead of athletes and spectators sits a herd of trucks, poised and ready to be deployed as makeshift morgues to the state’s hospitals. 

Bodies are seen stacked in refrigerated morgue trailers at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, on Tuesday

Bodies are seen wrapped in sheets in the back of the refrigerated trucks at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center

Hospital morgues have been overflowing, leading to harrowing scenes where body bags litter hospital corridors and refrigerated trucks parked outside are acting as makeshift facilities

Workers in Hazmat gear are seen outside the refrigerated trucks were the bodies of victims lie 

Refrigerated trucks have already become fixtures outside New York City hospitals, with harrowing emerges emerging Tuesday of bodies stacked up in morgue trailers outside Brookdale Hospital Medical Center, Brooklyn.   

In one photo, medical workers in Hazmat suits and face masks are stood outside the front of trucks, as behidn them lies several victims of the pandemic wrapped up in white body bags inside.   

The morbid scene appeared to show the lorries almost at capacity, as the city continues to be the epicenter of the US crisis.

The knock-on effect on the state’s funeral homes, cemeteries and crematoriums has been equally dismal, as the facilities cannot keep up with the demand, leaving the bodies of the fallen with nowhere to go

The morbid scene appeared to show the lorries almost at capacity, as the city continues to be the epicenter of the US crisis

In one photo, medical workers in Hazmat suits and face masks are stood outside the front of trucks, as behidn them lies several victims of the pandemic wrapped up in white body bags inside

THE GRISLY HISTORY OF HART ISLAND: THE FINAL RESTING PLACE FOR OVER ONE MILLION BODIES

Hart Island, sometimes referred to as Hart’s Island, has a grisly history and started being used as a cemetery during the civil war in 1868 and there are now more than a million bodies buried there.

Since then it has been used as a women’s psychiatric institution, a tuberculosis sanatorium, a potter’s field burial site and storage for Cold War anti-aircraft missiles.

After its first use as a cemetery in 1868, the island started to be used as a potter’s field for unmarked graves and accounts from the time describe bodies piling up on the island after being transported from hospitals in the city.

By 1958, burials there exceeded 500,000 and it has been used to house the bodies of victims of the 1870 yellow fever epidemic and the 1919 Spanish Flu outbreak.

During the Spanish Flu, when more than 500,000 Americans died, thousands were buried at Hart Island as city burial sites were overwhelmed.

It is estimated they would be asked to remove between 50 and 5,000 victims a day during the epidemic.

In more recent times, thousands of unclaimed AIDs victims have been buried on the island. The first were buried in 1985 away from other graves, in the belief that AIDs could infect dead bodies.

In one 200-foot trench the remains of 8,904 babies were buried between 1988 and 1999.

The island in Long Island Sound has also been the site of a homeless shelter, a boys’ reformatory, a jail and a drug rehabilitation center. 

It returned to being used as a common grave in the 1980s and is still used to bury unknown or unclaimed people with bodies from across New York taken to the site twice a week and laid to rest by inmates at Rikers Island.

Due to a New York State law from the 1850s and last amended in 2007, a dead person’s next of kin on have 48 hours after death to claim a body for burial.

If the body is unclaimed it becomes legally available as a medical cadavar to be used for training at medical schools or mortuary classes. 

The island, which can only be accessed by ferryboat, was sold to the city in 1868 and became a final resting place for unclaimed bodies and those used by medical schools.

In the 19th century slave owners in the South ‘donated’ or sold bodies of dead slaves to medical schools.

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Chilling video appears to show NYC prisoners burying bodies amid Covid-19 crisis

Unsettling drone footage appears to show New York City prisoners burying coffins in a mass grave.

The video, shot on Hart Island in the Bronx, shows a group of prisoners wearing protective gear as they lower coffins into the ground. A bulldozer is then seen dumping dirt on the coffins, which lined one end of a long trench.

Hart Island has been used to bury New York City’s unclaimed dead for more than 150 years. The island is the largest mass graveyard in the US, containing more than one million unclaimed bodies, although the coronavirus outbreak, which has killed over 6,000 in New York state, has thrust the island into the national spotlight as the city struggles to cope with its mounting death toll.

The New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner announced on Tuesday that unclaimed bodies will no longer be held in refrigerated city storage for 30 days, which was the city’s previous policy. Instead, they will now hold unclaimed bodies for less than a week before sending them to the mass grave on Hart Island, which is called City Cemetary.

‘As we aim to accommodate the many New Yorkers who have been impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner will provide temporary storage of a decedent for up to six days,’ the office said in the announcement.

‘It’s a much more orderly burial operation now than it was even a short time ago. I think people want to know.’

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Cold War bomb tests show shark's age at time of death

Radioactive carbon that formed in the atmosphere during Cold War atomic bomb tests helps scientists determine the age of a 50-year-old endangered whale shark for the first time

  • Bomb tests in the 1950s and 1960s  left abundance of carbon isotope in oceans 
  • Scientists used traces of carbon-14 in sharks to find out their age at time of death
  • Growth bands in the dead shark’s vertebrae proved sharks age of up to 50 years 
  • Pinpointing their age can help conservation efforts of this endangered species  

Cold War atomic bomb testing from more than 50 years ago has helped scientists correctly determine the age of whale sharks for the first time.

An international team of scientists measured levels of a carbon isotope in shark bone that permeated the oceans during atomic bomb tests in the 1950s and 1960s.  

The presence of the carbon isotope – carbon-14 – in the shark bone told them that two sharks were up to 50 years old at time of their eventual death.

The study of the whale shark – the world’s largest fish – will help ensure the future of the endangered and protected species, the researchers say. 

Australian Institute of Marine Science of Dr Mark Meekan, a researcher with the Australian Institute of Marine Science in Perth, swimming with a whale shark

‘Earlier modelling studies have suggested that the largest whale sharks may live as long as 100 years,’ said Mark Meekan from the Australian Institute of Marine Science in Perth, Western Australia.

‘However, although our understanding of the movements, behaviour, connectivity and distribution of whale sharks have improved dramatically over the last 10 years, basic life history traits such as age, longevity and mortality remain largely unknown.

‘Our study shows that adult sharks can indeed attain great age and that long lifespans are probably a feature of the species. 

‘Now we have another piece of the jigsaw added.’  

Whale shark vertebra from Pakistan, in cross section, showing 50 growth bands

WHAT IS THE WHALE SHARK?

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is the largest living fish.

It can reach a length of about 59 feet (18 metres).

It forages for food at or near the surface of the ocean.

Its large mouth is well adapted to filter feeding, meaning it feeds by straining suspended matter and food particles from water.

The whale shark contains more than 300 rows of small, pointed teeth in each jaw.

Whale sharks inhabit warm waters around the world.

They are found in the western Atlantic Ocean from the coast of New York to central Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

Whale sharks also inhabit the Indian Ocean and the western and central Pacific.

The species is labelled ‘endangered’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, with populations decreasing. 

It is a docile species that poses no threat to humans. 

Today, whale sharks are endangered and protected as a high-value species for eco-tourism.

Conservation strategies for endangered and threatened species, including the whale shark, require accurate estimates of factors such as age and growth. 

But until now, the age of the sharks has been difficult to measure, as sharks and rays lack bony structures that are used to determine the age of other fish.

So a team of researchers, including Dr Meekan, turned to the radioactive legacy of the Cold War’s nuclear arms race. 

During the 1950s and 1960s, the USA, the Soviet Union, Great Britain, France and China conducted tests of nuclear weapons, many of which were detonated several kilometres in the air.

One result of the blasts was an atmospheric doubling of carbon-14, which is commonly used by archaeologists and historians to date ancient bones and artefacts.

The rate of decay of carbon-14 is constant and easily measured, making it ideal for providing age estimates for anything over 300 years old. 

The isotope gradually moves through food webs into living animals and plants, producing an elevated carbon-14 signature.

The nearly 60-foot-long whale shark doesn’t generally pose a threat to humans. The species is described as endangered with populations decreasing still

Whale shark vertebrae, meanwhile, feature distinct bands – much like the rings of a tree trunk, which increase in number as the animal grows older.

Some studies suggest that a new ring is formed every year, while others conclude that it happens every six months. 

‘We found that one growth ring was definitely deposited every year,’ Dr Meekan said.

‘This is very important, because if you over or under-estimate growth rates you will inevitably end up with a management strategy that doesn’t work, and you’ll see the population crash.’ 

Measuring the radioisotope levels in the successive growth rings allowed a clear determination of how often they were created, giving an indication of the shark’s age.

Using the bomb radiocarbon data, Dr Meekan and his team conducted testing of from sectioned vertebrae from two deceased whale sharks in Pakistan and Taiwan. 

Ages of up to 50 years were estimated at time of death – the first time such an age has been unambiguously verified.

The results, which have been published in Frontiers in Marine Science, also confirm the use of sectioned vertebrae as age indicators for these sharks. 

WHAT IS CARBON DATING AND HOW IS IT USED?  

Carbon dating, also referred to as radiocarbon dating or carbon-14 dating, is a method that is used to determine the age of an object. 

It can only be used on objects containing organic material – that was once ‘alive’ and therefore contained carbon.    

The element carbon apears in nature in a few slightly different varieties, depending on the amount of neutrons in its nucleus. 

Called isotopes, these different types of carbon all behave differently.  

Most of the stable, naturally occurring carbon on Earth is carbon 12 – it accounts for 99 per cent of the element on our planet. 

Another carbon isotope is Carbon-14, a radioactive version of carbon.

It occurs naturally in the atmosphere as part of carbon dioxide, and animals absorb it when they breathe. 

Animals stop taking it in when they die, and a finite amount of the chemical is stored in the body. 

Radioactive substances all have a half-life, the length of time it takes for a material to lose half of its radioactivity. 

Carbon-14 has a long half-life, 5,370 years to be exact. 

This long half-life can be used to find out how old objects are by measuring how much radioactivity is left in a specimen.

Due to the long half-life, archaeologists have been able to date items up to 50,000 years old.  

Radiocarbon dating was first invented in the 1940s by an American physical chemist called Willard Libby. He won the 1960 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery.

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Spectacular images show birds fighting over seeds at nature reserve

Who do you think you’re robin? Spectacular images show birds fighting over seeds at nature reserve

  • The birds scrapped over their seeds at Brockholes Nature Reserve near Preston
  • Robin and a blue tit were pictured in a beak-to-beak brawl by David Bennion, 62 
  • The tit cheekily swooped in to pinch a seed that was left on a post for the birds

Sharing food convivially is a pastime enjoyed by most.

But it seems these birds don’t hold the same opinion, scrapping over some succulent seeds at Brockholes Nature Reserve near Preston.

The robin and a blue tit were photographed in a beak-to-beak brawl by David Bennion, 62, after the tit cheekily swooped in to pinch a seed or two.

The food had been left on a post for the reserve’s residents to enjoy. 

The robin and a blue tit were photographed in a beak-to-beak brawl over some succulent seeds at Brockholes Nature Reserve near Preston

But what was meant as a sharing platter ended up as a battle of furious wings and talons – with the robin emerging victorious to claim the whole stash, while the tit was forced into a humiliating retreat.

Mr Bennion said: ‘I had put some seed on a fence post to lure the birds – my plan then is to take shots as they fly away so I’d get them in flight with the wing details.

‘A robin landed and started to feed- they are always the most difficult to capture in flight because they are bold and will feed for quite a while hence it is not easy to predict when they will take off.

‘Normally all the other birds will stay away while a Robin is feeding because they are quite aggressive and territorial.

‘While the robin was feeding a little bluetit decided he wasn’t going to wait and tried to land on the fence post.

‘This triggered a firm rebuff from the robin and it attacked the blue tit very aggressively.

‘The blue tit flew off and normally that would be the end of it but this time the Robin pursued it and actually grabbed it in mid air before throwing it like a tennis ball.

‘The blue tit wasn’t harmed and actually came back for seed a few minutes later.

‘Everything was so fast so I was pleased to have captured the details and was surprised at how aggressively the robin had stuck its claws into the blue tit.’  

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Beyoncé Shares Video to Show What the Personalities of Her Twins, Rumi and Sir, Are Really Like

Beyoncé’s twins are already superstars in the making. Thanks to Beyoncé’s yearly recap, fans have their first glimpse into the personality of Rumi and Sir. (And they’re totally adorable.) Here’s what fans learned about Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s children, Blue Ivy, Rumi, and Sir Carter.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z fans first met Sir and Rumi Carter in 2017

This duo is more than just international superstars and entrepreneurs. Beyoncé and Jay-Z are the parents of three children. During 2017, the couple announced the birth of their twins, Sir and Rumi, with an Instagram post. Later, Beyoncé described her experience as a mother. 

“It’s important to me that they [my daughters] see themselves as CEOs, as bosses, and that they know they can write the script for their own lives—that they can speak their minds and they have no ceiling,” Beyoncé said, according to Elle Magazine.

“I hope to teach my son not to fall victim to what the internet says he should be or how he should love,” she continued. “I want to create better representations for him so he is allowed to reach his full potential as a man, and to teach him that the real magic he possesses in the world is the power to affirm his own existence.”

Beyoncé shared video clips from Rumi and Sir’s 2nd Birthday party

In true Beyoncé fashion, The Lion King voice actress posted a few of her favorite moments from 2019 to ring in the new year and the new decade. Included in those pictures and videos was a sneak peek into the birthday party of the twins, Rumi and Sir Carter.

This was a very brief look at Beyoncé’s party. Still, viewers could see these twins dressed in their birthday best, already walking across a patch of grass. There was also a colorful cake, giant letters spelling out “two,” and a video of Sir with his hand shielding his face. The yearly “Beycap” also featured clips of Beyoncé’s oldest daughter, Blue Ivy Carter.

Rumi and Sir Carter have not yet made a public appearance

It’s rare for Beyoncé to post pictures (or videos) of the twins. They’ve also never made their public debut, unlike their older sibling, Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s daughter, Blue Ivy Carter. Most recently, Blue Ivy hung out at a Lakers game with her father. 

There, she asked Lebron James if she could have an autographed basketball, still a little shy when approaching the athlete. In the past, she’s gone to award shows, the Super Bowl, and her parents’ concerts on the On The Run II Tour. Blue Ivy also posed alongside her mother and Megan Thee Stallion at a New Year’s Eve party, some fans noticing how similar she looked to Beyoncé. 

Beyoncé even featured Blue Ivy in songs like “Brown Skin Girl,” “Boss,” and “Blue.” For her joint album with Jay-Z, The Carters, Blue Ivy gave a shoutout to her younger siblings, closing out the song with, “shoutout to Rumi and Sir, love Blue.”

Music by Beyoncé, including The Lion King: The Gift, is available on Apple Music, Tidal, Spotify, and most major streaming platforms. 

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