Britain braces for more torrential downpours today

Britain braces for more torrential downpours today after a fortnight’s rain fell in 24 hours during Storm Aiden with 74 flood alerts issued – before cold air from Greenland sends temperatures plunging by 10C ahead of Bonfire Night

  • Sunday saw much of the North-West of England pummelled by rainfall brought by Storm Aiden
  • Met Office forecaster Oli Claydon said the wet weather is set to continue on Monday into Tuesday
  • Between 0.8 and 1.2inches (20-30mm) of rain expected in the North-West of England and Western Scotland
  • But temperatures are initially set to be unusually high at this time of year and could peak as high as 64.4 (18C)
  • They will then plummet by as much as 10C (50F) cold, making a maximum of 55F (13C) ahead of Bonfire Night

Britain is braced for more torrential downpours today after a fortnight’s rain fell in 24 hours during Storm Aiden.

Cold air from Greenland is also set to send temperatures plunging by 10C (50F) ahead of Bonfire Night on Thursday.

Sunday saw much of the North-West of England pummelled by rainfall brought by Storm Aiden, with nearly four inches of rain falling in just 24 hours. The average for the whole month of November is 10inches.

And last month was also record-breaking, with Saturday October 3rd seeing enough rainfall to more than fill the Loch Ness.

Met Office forecaster Oli Claydon said the wet weather is set to continue on Monday into Tuesday, with between 0.8 and 1.2inches (20-30mm) expected in the North-West of England and Western Scotland.

But temperatures are initially set to be unusually high for this time of year and could peak as high as 64.4 (18C) in the South-East of England before plummeting overnight. 

Britain is braced for more torrential downpours today after a fortnight’s rain fell in 24 hours during Storm Aiden. Pictured: Huge Waves hit the sea front by the lighthouse at sunrise in Porthcawl, South Wales, on Monday

Cold air from Greenland is also set to send temperatures plunging by 10C (50F) ahead of Bonfire Night on Thursday. Pictured: Huge waves smash into the rocks in front of the Mumbles Lighthouse at Bracelet Bay in Swansea, Wales, on Monday

Overall, 74 flood warnings and alerts have been issued by the Environment Agency, with parts of Dorset, the Midlands and the North-West of England at risk of further heavy rain.

Speaking to MailOnline, Mr Claydon said rain will linger in the North-West and in Scotland on Monday but added there is ‘still quite a large amount of sunshine to be had’ during the day. 

However, going into Tuesday, it is set to get as much as 10C (50F) colder, meaning it will be a maximum of 55F (13C) in the south ahead of Bonfire Night on Thursday.

Moving further through the week, Mr Claydon said ‘we are only just getting to double figures’ in terms of temperatures in Celsius – around 52F. 

Temperatures are initially set to be unusually high for this time of year and could peak as high as 64.4 (18C) in the South-East of England before plummeting later in the week. Pictured: Surfers at Langland Bay near Swansea on Monday morning

Overall, 74 flood warnings and alerts have been issued by the Environment Agency, with parts of Dorset, the Midlands and the North-West of England at risk of further heavy rain. Pictured: Council litter pickers are caught  out by the waves at Langland Bay in Swansea on Monday morning

Moving further through the week, Mr Claydon said ‘we are only just getting to double figures’ in terms of temperatures in Celsius – around 52F. Pictured: Sunrays stream through the dark clouds at first light on Monday morning

Overnight in the early hours of Wednesday and Thursday, it could be as cold as 0C (32F) in central parts of the UK. 

As for wind, Mr Claydon said: ‘Today we could see up to 40knt (46mph) gusts in exposed locations and exposed coastal locations it could be higher.

‘As we go through the week, the wind speeds will gradually reduce as the high pressure starts to dominate.

‘From Tuesday night, the influence of high pressure from the Atlantic starts to take hold.

‘The skies are clearer, leading to some cold temperatures on Wednesday morning, leading to the chance of frost in the south and central parts.

‘A chilly start to Wednesday morning, certainly compared to the previous mild temperatures. Wednesday itself, a few showers around but generally bright, clear conditions.

‘Another cold night in central and southern parts into Thursday. And then Friday is really probably the last day where the high pressure will stay in charge.


Met Office forecaster Oli Claydon said the wet weather is set to continue on Monday into Tuesday, with between 0.8 and 1.2inches (20-30mm) expected in the North-West of England and Western Scotland. Temperatures are set to be unusually high at this time of year and could peak as high as 64.4 (18C) in the South-East of England

‘So still settled into Friday with bright, dry conditions for many, before more unsettled conditions move in from the south into the weekend,’ he added.

On Sunday, there was 100ml of rainfall across north-west England – the average for the whole of November is just over 155ml for the region.

Yesterday was also potentially a record-breaking one for temperatures, with 18.4C recorded at Hawarden Airport near the Welsh-English border.

The Met Office is set to confirm later on Monday if this set a new record for November.

In Suffolk, a temperature of 18.1C was also recorded and it was warm overnight as well, with some weather stations recording a low of 16.

The lowest temperature recorded was 4.1C in Inverness and wind speeds reached 74mph in the Western Isles.

In Norfolk, the bad weather saw more than 1,000 homes lose electricity and engineers were working on Monday to restore power.

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